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AMP's International Jazz Day - Washington, DC 2014 Concert Program PosterAMP Celebrates International Jazz Day!

AMP celebrated 2014 International Jazz Day with a DC Concert at Busboys & Poets featuring George Washington University’s King James and the Serfs of Swing, a tribute to Rufus Harley by Noah Harmony Shoatz Harley and musical selections from Dave and Iola Brubeck’s “The Real Ambassadors” featuring Louis Armstrong.

In November 2011 UNESCO and the Thelonius Monk Institute of Jazz designated April 30th a day to appreciate the role jazz has played in fostering peace, dialogue and respect (…more)

If lots more of us loved each other,
We’d solve lots more problems.

Louis Armstrong  (1901 – 1971)
(click to hear Louis Armstrong)

 

An Evening with Lucretia Mott

Quaker Minister, Abolitionist, Suffragist, and Anti-War Activist, Wife and Mother

AMP's Lucretia Coffin Mott Program Flyer for Saturday, 19th event at Friends Meeting of Washington, DC

 

The cause of Peace has had my share of efforts, taking the ultra non-resistance ground — that a Christian cannot consistently uphold, and actively support, a government based on the sword, or whose ultimate resort is to the destroying weapons.

 

The requirements of truth have ever been similar in ages and as nations have been prepared by circumstance to receive it, they have ever found it requiring “righteousness and true holiness.”  I want this age to be more zealous of good fruits of everyday righteousness and true holiness in business, in all transactions of life.

Lucretia Mott (1793 – 1880)

In an age when most women were not expected to think about issues of the day, Lucretia Mott not only contemplated them, but also spoke out on them.
She was raised in a Quaker community in Massachusetts and married James Mott. By 1818 she was serving as a Public Friend visiting and speaking to other Quaker communities. As a follower of Elias Hicks, she emphasized the divinity within every individual.

Her early sermons spoke of the necessity of the Anti-Slavery movement and advocated the use of Free Produce. By the early 1830s she had become a familiar sight on the abolitionist podium, and was elected as an American Representative to the 1840 General (or World’s) Anti-Slavery Convention, held in London, England. Before the conference in London began, a majority of the men in attendance voted to exclude women from participating, and the female delegates were required to sit in a segregated area. It was during this time that Lucretia began to face the realization that in addition to the cause of Anti-Slavery, she would muster her efforts to the struggle for women’s equality.In an age when most women were not expected to think about issues of the day, Lucretia Mott not only contemplated them, but also spoke out on them. She was raised in a Quaker community in Massachusetts and… (…more)

 

We Give Thanks

To those who established and extended the universal principles of life and liberty as tenets by which we live and govern;

To those who recognized other lives as their own, whose love, concern and respect for humanity paved a better way;

To those who live according to their conscience to embody justice, compassion, integrity, benevolence, cooperation and goodwill;

To those who make the principles of peace a living reality, we give thanks.

We cannot live alone.
And the thing that made this moment possible for you and for me, has been brought about by many people whom we will never know.
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Marian Anderson (1897 – 1993)

 

 

 

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